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Cornetín

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Song

Cornetín (Cornet) is the title of a tango written by Homero Manzi and Cátulo Castillo in 1942. The music was composed by Pedro Maffia.

Music
Genre:

Tango

Composer(s):

Pedro Maffia

Year of composition:

1942

Lyrics

Lyrics writer(s):

Homero Manzi
Cátulo Castillo


Recordings

At the moment, there are no recordings for this song stored in the TangoWiki. If you have sources, add a new recording.

Lyrics

Spanish: Cornetín

Tarí, Tarí...
Lo apelan Roque Barullo,
conductor del Nacional.

Con su tramway, sin cuarta ni cinchón,
sabe cruzar el barrancón de Cuyo.
El cornetín, colgado de un piolín,
y en el ojal un medallón de yuyo.

Tarí, tarí...
y el cuerno listo al arrullo
si hay percal en un zaguán.

Calá, que linda está la moza,
calá, barriendo la vereda,
Calá, mirá que bien le queda,
calá, la pollerita rosa.
Frená, que va a subir la vieja,
frená porque se queja,
si está en movimiento.
Calá, calá que sopla el viento,
calá, calá calamidad.

Tarí, tarí,
trota la yunta,
palomas chapaleando en el barrial.

Talán, tilín,
resuena el campanín
del mayoral
picando en son de broma
y el conductor
castiga sin parar
para pasar
sin papelón la loma
Tarí, tarí,
que a lo mejor se le asoma,
cualquier moza de un portal.

Qué linda esta la moza,
barriendo la vereda,
mirá que bien le queda,
la pollerita rosa.
Frená, que va a subir la vieja,
Frená porque se queja
si está en movimiento,
calá, calá que sopla el viento,
calá, calá calamidad.

Tarí, Tarí...
Conduce Roque Barullo
de la línea Nacional.

English: Cornet

Tah-ree, tah-ree...
They call him Roque Barullo,
driver of the Nacional.[1]

With his tramway, without crop nor strap,
he knows how to traverse the big gully of Cuyo.
The cornet, hung by a string,
and in the buttonhole, a weed medallion.

Tah-ree, tah-ree...
and the horn ready to lull
if there’s percale[2] on a hallway.

Check it out, how pretty that young girl is,
check it out, sweeping the sidewalk,
check it out, how nice it looks on her,
check it out, the little pink skirt.
Halt, that the old lady is about to get on.
Halt, because she complains
if it’s moving.
Check it, check it out, the wind blows,
cala-, cala-, calamity.[3]

Tah-ree, tah-ree,
the horses in the yoke trot,
pigeons splash about in the mud.

Tah-lan, tee-leen,
resounds the little bell
of the foreman,
ringing as a joke,
and the driver
punishes it, without stopping
to pass the hill
without embarassment,
tah-ree, tah-ree,
in case any young girl
will come out of a gate.

How pretty that young girl is,
sweeping the sidewalk.
See how nice it looks on her,
the little pink skirt.
Halt, that the old lady is about to get on.
Halt, because she complains
if it’s moving.
Check it, check it out, the wind blows,
cala-, cala-, calamity.

Tah-ree, tah-ree...
The driver’s Roque Barullo
of the Nacional line.

References

  1. Tramway line.
  2. Young woman dressed in percale.
  3. Play on words. Phonetic/orthographic similarity between Verb calar and noun calamity.

Further links